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training:itu-ipv6:address-plan [2016/05/24 08:29] (current)
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 +Address Space Allocation
 +========================
 +
 +This document describes the IP address plan we will use for this set of workshop exercises.
 +
 +Wherever possible the plan tries to replicate real life as closely as possible.
 +
 +The IPv4 address space used in these exercises is from subnets of 100.64.0.0/​10 which is an [IPv4 Shared Address](https://​tools.ietf.org/​html/​rfc6598) block. **It must not be routed on the Internet.**
 +
 +Note that 2001:​DB8::/​32 is the [IPv6 Documentation Address](https://​tools.ietf.org/​html/​rfc3849) block. **It must not be routed on the Internet.**
 +
 +And finally note that the 2001:​10::/​28 address block has been listed in the [IANA special registry](http://​www.iana.org/​assignments/​iana-ipv6-special-registry/​iana-ipv6-special-registry.xhtml) for future use. **It must not be routed on the Internet.**
 +
 +**If using these labs as inspiration for your own infrastructure design, please replace all instances of private, documentation,​ and unassigned address space with your own address blocks.**
 +
 +End-Site networks
 +-----------------
 +
 +If they are not a Regional Internet Registry member, end-site networks typically will receive a public IPv6 /48 and a very small public IPv4 block from their network operator.
 +
 +We will use an IPv4 /24 for these exercises, reflecting the fact that in reality an end-site organisation will use a large private block like a /16 internally, NATed out into a small public IPv4 block like the /24 we are using here.
 +
 +^ **Group** ^ **Public IPv4** ^ **IPv6** ​        ^ **ASN** ^
 +| 1         | 100.68.10.0/​24 ​ | 2001:​DB8:​10::/​48 | 101     |
 +| 2         | 100.68.20.0/​24 ​ | 2001:​DB8:​20::/​48 | 102     |
 +| 3         | 100.68.30.0/​24 ​ | 2001:​DB8:​30::/​48 | 103     |
 +| 4         | 100.68.40.0/​24 ​ | 2001:​DB8:​40::/​48 | 104     |
 +| 5         | 100.68.50.0/​24 ​ | 2001:​DB8:​50::/​48 | 105     |
 +| 6         | 100.68.60.0/​24 ​ | 2001:​DB8:​60::/​48 | 106     |
 +
 +
 +*The list will continue in the same pattern if there are more groups.*
 +
 +Each group will then further partition their space as follows:
 +
 +^ **IPv4** ​        ^ **IPv6** ​             ^ **Description** ​     ^
 +| 100.68.X0.0/​24 ​  | 2001:​DB8:​X0::/​48 ​     | Group address block  |
 +| 100.68.X0.0/​26 ​  | 2001:​DB8:​X0:​0000::/​50 | Infrastructure space |
 +| 100.68.X0.0/​28 ​  | 2001:​DB8:​X0:​0000::/​64 | Router loopbacks ​    |
 +| 100.68.X0.16/​28 ​ | 2001:​DB8:​X0:​0010::/​60 | Point-to-point links |
 +| 100.68.X0.64/​26 ​ | 2001:​DB8:​X0:​4000::/​50 | End user space 1     |
 +| 100.68.X0.128/​26 | 2001:​DB8:​X0:​8000::/​50 | End user space 2     |
 +| 100.68.X0.192/​26 | 2001:​DB8:​X0:​C000::/​50 | End user space 3     |
 +
 +Where X is your group number (1,2,3...).
 +
 +Prefixes for point-to-point links will be of length /30 for IPv4 and /127 for IPv6 (we will adopt the recommendations of [RFC6164](https://​tools.ietf.org/​html/​rfc6164) for IPv6 inter-router links where we reserve a /64 for the link but subnet it as a /127):
 +
 +^ **IPv4** ​       ^ **IPv6** ​            ^ **Description** ^
 +| 100.68.X0.16/​30 | 2001:​DB8:​X0:​10::/​127 | P2P CX <-> BX   |
 +| 100.68.X0.20/​30 | 2001:​DB8:​X0:​11::/​127 | P2P CX <-> PX   |
 +| 100.68.X0.24/​30 | 2001:​DB8:​X0:​12::/​127 | P2P CX <-> AX   |
 +
 +Router loopback address subnet masks will be /32 for IPv4 and /128 for IPv6:
 +
 +^ **IPv4** ​      ^ **IPv6** ​          ^ **Description** ^
 +| 100.68.X0.1/​32 | 2001:​DB8:​X0::​1/​128 | BX Loopback ​    |
 +| 100.68.X0.2/​32 | 2001:​DB8:​X0::​2/​128 | CX Loopback ​    |
 +| 100.68.X0.3/​32 | 2001:​DB8:​X0::​3/​128 | PX Loopback ​    |
 +| 100.68.X0.4/​32 | 2001:​DB8:​X0::​4/​128 | AX Loopback ​    |
 +
 +Note that the convention used here assigns the beginning of the IPv4 and IPv6 address space for use for infrastructure. This is generally a matter of choice: some network operators use the beginning of the space, others use the end of the space.
 +
 +Transit Providers
 +-----------------
 +
 +Commercial network operators receive at minimum an IPv6 /32 from their regional internet registry. IPv4 allocations can range upwards from /22. We will use an IPv4 /16 for our exercises.
 +
 +^ **Transit Provider‚Äč** ^ **IPv4** ​      ^ **IPv6** ​    ^ **ASN** ^
 +| 1                    | 100.121.0.0/​16 | 2001:​18::/​32 | 121     |
 +| 2                    | 100.122.0.0/​16 | 2001:​19::/​32 | 122     |
 +
 +The point-to-point link addresses from Transit Providers 1 and 2 to the End-sites are listed next. Note that the Transit Providers will get the low address, and the end-site gets the high address in the subnet.
 +
 +^ **Group** ^ **IPv4** ​      ^ **IPv6** ​          ^
 +| 1         | 100.121.1.0/​30 | 2001:​18:​0:​10::/​127 |
 +| 2         | 100.121.1.4/​30 | 2001:​18:​0:​11::/​127 |
 +| 3         | 100.121.1.8/​30 | 2001:​18:​0:​12::/​127 |
 +| 4         | 100.122.1.0/​30 | 2001:​19:​0:​10::/​127 |
 +| 5         | 100.122.1.4/​30 | 2001:​19:​0:​11::/​127 |
 +| 6         | 100.122.1.8/​30 | 2001:​19:​0:​12::/​127 |
 +
 +**Note:** The numbering started at the second /24 for the IPv4 point-to-point links to "end customers"​. The first /24 is kept for number infrastructure within the ISP, for example: loopbacks, internal point-to-point links, etc. The same applies to IPv6, where the first sixteen /64s were kept for loopbacks (the first /64) and internal point-to-point links (the next fifteen /64s).
 +
 +The address for the point to point link between Regional ISP 1 and Regional ISP 2 is given in this table:
 +
 +^ **Link** ​              ^ **IPv4** ​      ^ **IPv6** ​         ^
 +| Transit 1 to Transit 2 | 100.121.0.0/​30 | 2001:​18:​0:​0::/​127 |
 +
  
training/itu-ipv6/address-plan.txt · Last modified: 2016/05/24 08:29 (external edit)